Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.695680
Title: The self and wellbeing
Author: McWhirter, Joanne
Awarding Body: Queen's University Belfast
Current Institution: Queen's University Belfast
Date of Award: 2015
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Abstract:
Includes a systematic review of the assessment of mental health in looked after children; identifying the psychometric tools used to assess this and the appropriateness of their use in this population based on their psychometric properties and clinical utilities. Seventeen tools were identified with the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCl) the most widely used psychometric tool followed by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Despite this, of the tools identified, only the Assessment Checklist for Children (ACC) was developed for a looked after child population with comparable norms. Recent research on the use of the Behaviour Assessment Checklist for Children- 2 (BASC-2) on its use in this population is promising, highlighting, along with the SDQ, the need for adjustment in the interpretation of scores for this population. The limitations of the use of psychometric tools in the assessment and/or screening of mental health in this population are discussed as are the limitations of this systematic review and need for further research. The research paper included considers the relationship between self-concept clarity, perceived social support and models of self and others in the context of attachment and the ability of these variables to predict psychological well-being in adulthood. Results showed positive relationships between variables, however, only self-concept clarity and perceived social support were predictive of psychological wellbeing F (4,130) =53.98, p<.001. The impact of disruption in living environment in childhood on self-concept clarity was also considered but it did not show significant differences, however, limitations are discussed. Opportunities for further research and clinical implications are also discussed.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psych.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.695680  DOI: Not available
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