Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.693964
Title: Kinetic template-guided tethering of fragments
Author: Nonoo, Rebecca Helen
Awarding Body: Imperial College London
Current Institution: Imperial College London
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
This thesis is composed of two separate projects: Kinetic Template-Guided Tethering of Fragments and Design and Synthesis of a Chemical Probe to Dissect the Cellular Signalling Cascade leading to Cyclin D1 Degradation after DNA Damage. Kinetic Template-Guided Tethering of Fragments The development of a novel methodology for the site-directed discovery of small molecule, protein-binding ligands is described. The protein of interest, with a cysteine thiol (either native or engineered) adjacent to the desired binding pocket, is incubated with mixtures of low molecular weight compounds (fragments) modified with either an acrylamide or a vinyl sulfonamide capture group. Any ligand within the mixture that binds within the pocket brings the capture group into close proximity with the cysteine thiol, promoting a conjugate addition reaction at an increased rate over the background reaction. The capture reaction is designed to be slow, such that during the time course of an experiment, no adduct formation is observed unless the reaction is templated by the protein. By this method, binding ligands are rapidly identified by mass spectrometry analysis of the crude reaction mixtures. The methodology has been termed 'kinetic template-guided tethering'. Design and Synthesis of a Chemical Probe to Dissect the Cellular Signalling Cascade leading to Cyclin D1 Degradation after DNA Damage An inhibitor described within the literature was found to attenuate the reduction of cyclin D1 after DNA damage to cells. In order to implement a two-step chemical proteomics strategy to find the molecular target of this inhibitor, a synthesis of the compound with an alkyne appendage was required. The alkyne acts as a functional handle for attachment of a reporter molecule in cells via the Huisgen cycloaddition ('Click') reaction. The design and synthesis of this inhibitor with the alkyne appendage is described.
Supervisor: Mann, David ; Armstrong, Alan Sponsor: Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.693964  DOI: Not available
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