Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.693884
Title: Potential effects of anaesthetics on cancer recurrence following surgery : molecular mechanisms
Author: Benzonana, Laura Lina
Awarding Body: Imperial College London
Current Institution: Imperial College London
Date of Award: 2012
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Abstract:
Patients with solid tumours are likely to undergo surgery during the course of their disease. Surgery and anaesthesia may influence the tumour's metastatic potential. Certain anaesthetics are shown to induce cellular phenotypic changes via cellular signalling pathways; including the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) pathway. HIFs are heavily implicated in tumorigenesis and may play an important role in tumour cell proliferation, migration, invasion and angiogenesis (VEGF signalling). In the current thesis I aimed to investigate the potential impact of isoflurane on tumour cell progression and metastatic potential, as well as the potential anti-cancer effects of helium (a potential insuflation gas) in vitro. In a series of experiments, renal and prostate cancer cells were exposed to different anaesthetics and their effects on the metastatic potential of the cells were observed using different techniques such as western blotting, fluorescent immunocytochemistry, MTT assays, trypan blue assay and migration assays. The data derived from my PhD project show that isoflurane anaesthesia results in an increased metastatic potential of renal cell carcinoma and prostate cancer cells by increasing cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. The mechanism partially responsible for this effect has been shown to be the PI3K/HIF pathway. Furthermore helium was shown to have an anti-cancer effect on both cancer cell lines. These findings may have clinical implications for cancer patient care undergoing surgery under anaesthesia. Understanding the role of anaesthetics on growth and metastasis will defiantly shed light to better treatment options for cancer patients.
Supervisor: Ma, Daqing Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.693884  DOI: Not available
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