Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.693381
Title: When pedagogy met technology : a case study in media education
Author: Fraser, Pete
ISNI:       0000 0004 5922 6696
Awarding Body: Bournemouth University
Current Institution: Bournemouth University
Date of Award: 2015
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Abstract:
This PhD thesis looks at how teachers and students from schools and colleges in England talk about the role of technology, particularly blogging, in the OCR A level Media Studies. This research seeks to give voice to both students and teachers about their experience and to focus more on the reality, as it is perceived by those using it, of technology in schools rather than the rhetoric which surrounds it. The thesis views the data through the lenses of both media education and educational technology, with particular reference to the sceptical approaches of Buckingham and Selwyn, informed by the social constructivism of Vygotsky. Findings from the study suggest that that the rhetoric about social media and digital technology use amongst young people overstates the level of their participation outside formal schooling and that the level of expertise brought by young people to technology in the classroom tends to be overestimated. It also suggests that the use made of ICT in their schooling outside media studies is extraordinarily limited, according to teacher and student accounts. Though these accounts indicate great enthusiasm for educational use of elements of Web 2.0, especially blogging, this study finds that the technology in isolation is not enough. For the most purposeful teaching and learning, the technology was found to be just one important element of a ‘powerful learning environment’ which involves a ‘perfect storm’ of many parts of a social constructivist approach.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.693381  DOI: Not available
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