Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.692599
Title: Selection of modelling level of detail for incorporating stress analysis into evolutionary robotics simulations of extinct and extant vertebrates
Author: Mustansar, Zartasha
ISNI:       0000 0004 5919 185X
Awarding Body: University of Manchester
Current Institution: University of Manchester
Date of Award: 2015
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Abstract:
This thesis concerns the simulation of locomotion in vertebrates. The state-of-the-art uses genetic algorithms together with solid body kinematics to generate possible solutions for stable gaits. In recent work, this methodology led to a hopping gait in a dinosaur and the researchers wondered if this was realistic. The purpose of the research carried out in this thesis was to examine whether quick and simple finite-element analyses could be added to the simulator, to evaluate a simple ―break or―not break failure criterion. A break would rule out gaits that might damage theowner‘s skeleton. Linear elastic analysis was considered as a possible approach as it would add little overhead to the simulations. The author used X-ray computed tomography and the finite element method to examine the axial loading of a barnacle goose femur. The study considered four levels of detail for a linear elastic simulation, finding that all the analyses carried out overestimated the strength of the bone, when considering safety factors. The conclusion is that to incorporate stress-strain analysis into the gait simulation requires more realistic models of bone behaviour that incorporate the nonlinear response of bone to applied loading. A new study focusing on the use of novel techniques such as model order reduction is recommended for future work. The outputs of this research include chapters written up as journal papers covering a 4D tomography experiment; a level of detail study; an analysis of a purported tendon avulsion injury in Tyrannosaurus rex and a review of the elastic properties of bone.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Microsoft-Dorothy Hodgkin Postgraduate Award
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.692599  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Finite Element Analysis ; Branta leucopsis ; Computed tomography ; simulation ; strain
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