Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.692561
Title: An examination of the trans-nationality and applicability of Nonaka's theory of organizational knowledge creation to urban regeneration in UK
Author: Adachi, Y.
Awarding Body: University of London
Current Institution: University College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2007
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Abstract:
General awareness of a knowledge-based society and the academic interest in knowledge management (KM) in the field of organization studies have both intensified in recent years. However, research into 'knowledge' has, to date, received scant attention in the field of the urban regeneration process. This fact has greatly motivated this thesis, whose main objective is "to examine the trans-nationality and applicability of Nonaka's theory of organizational knowledge creation to urban regeneration in UK". After having introduced TEAM linguistic theory into the examination of the validity of the hypotheses of this thesis (see Chapter 2), the trans-nationality and applicability of Nonaka's theory are examined in the KM context of UK in particular - in both a theoretical and practical sense (see Chapter 3). Because there is no comprehensive theoretical framework which allows for a comparison to be made between urban regeneration theories and Nonaka's theory, from either an epistemological or ontological point of view, this thesis has looked in great depth into urban planning theory, rather than any literature on the theories of urban regeneration. It in particular, examines two sets of procedural theories of urban planning, namely Systems Theories and Rational Theories of Planning (see Chapter 4), and Communicative Planning Theory (see Chapter 5). In order to examine the applicability of Nonaka's theoretical frameworks to the empirical context of urban regeneration in the UK, case study research was conducted using the Creative Town Initiative (CTI) in Huddersfield (see Chapter 6) from which important generic and context specific conclusions have been drawn (see Chapter 7).
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.692561  DOI: Not available
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