Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.690947
Title: The impact of postpartum psychosis on partners
Author: Holford, Nia Caitlin
ISNI:       0000 0004 5916 1749
Awarding Body: Cardiff University
Current Institution: Cardiff University
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
Postpartum Psychosis is a severe mental health problem following childbirth, with a psychotic element and associated mood disturbance. Research to date has primarily focused on mothers’ experiences, and on identifying risk factors, aetiology, and intervention efficacy. Within both research and clinical communities, there has been little acknowledgement of partners’ experiences of Postpartum Psychosis, nor the important support role that partners can provide. The aim of this study was to consider the lived experiences of partners of women who have had Postpartum Psychosis, and the impact that it has had on their lives and relationships. Participants were partners recruited through the charity Action for Postpartum Psychosis. Partners were asked to complete an online questionnaire to provide basic demographic and contextual information, followed by an in-depth, semi-structured interview regarding their experiences of Postpartum Psychosis. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was used to analyse the interview transcripts. Partners reported a lack of support being provided to them, and typically perceived a deterioration in the quality of their couple relationship during, and following, the episode of Postpartum Psychosis. Seven superordinate themes were extracted from the interview data: powerlessness; united vs. individual coping; hypothesising and hindsight; barriers to accessing care and unmet needs; managing multiple roles; loss; and positive changes from Postpartum Psychosis. These findings provide a rich illustration of the experiences of partners, and highlight areas in which support could be provided for partners. Limitations of the study, and implications for future research and clinical practice, are discussed.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.690947  DOI: Not available
Keywords: BF Psychology
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