Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.690588
Title: Regulation and reaction : the development of Scottish traditional dance with particular reference to Aberdeenshire, from 1805 to the present day
Author: Ballantyne, Patricia H.
ISNI:       0000 0004 5914 6602
Awarding Body: University of Aberdeen
Current Institution: University of Aberdeen
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
This thesis examines historical developments in Scottish dance over the past two hundred years and considers how they combined to shape the current traditional dance and music culture in Scotland. This work examines the effects of increasing regulation and standardisation during the twentieth century through an assessment of the experiences, viewpoints and opinions of present-day practitioners. The business practice and increasing professionalisation of nineteenth-century dancing masters active in the North-East of Scotland, and that of A. Cosmo Mitchell in particular, is considered in relation to the formation of the regulatory societies. The introduction of standardisation is examined through a comparison of nineteenth- and twentiethcentury published sources for the 'Highland Fling'. Tensions and contrasts in traditional dance and music are assessed by a consideration of the approach taken by influential traditional music education establishments such as Fèisean nan Gàidheal and by examining the relationship between Highland dancing and Highland piping. Reactions to regulation such as the (re)introduction of percussive step dance to Scotland and the growth in popularity of informal, 'called' ceilidh dancing are evaluated. The relationship between traditional dance and music in Scotland today is considered in the light of recurring themes such as professionalisation, regulation, authority, reactions to the status quo and the revival of an approach to or concept of dance rather than the revival of an historically verifiable style.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.690588  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Folk dancing ; Scottish
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