Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.689577
Title: Factors influencing disclosure and help-seeking practices of Nigerian women resident in England with lived experience of domestic violence and abuse
Author: Femi-Ajao, Omolade Ibiyinka
ISNI:       0000 0004 5919 5797
Awarding Body: University of Manchester
Current Institution: University of Manchester
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
Background: Domestic violence and abuse is a public health problem affecting more than one third of all women globally. It usually takes place between individuals in intimate relationships and/or within the family. In the United Kingdom (UK), while theoretical and policy interventions have led to an increase in domestic violence and abuse service provision for women, there is paucity of research on the disclosure and help-seeking practices of women from ethnic minority populations. Aim: To identify factors influencing disclosure and help-seeking practices of Nigerian (ethnic minority population) women resident in England with lived experience of domestic violence and abuse, in order to make recommendations to relevant stakeholders on domestic violence service provision and utilisation. Methods: A cross-sectional qualitative research design was utilised. This included a qualitative systematic review of literature on domestic violence research among women from ethnic minority populations in the UK; individual, in-depth semi-structured interviews with 16 Nigerian women resident in England with lived experience of domestic violence and abuse, and with nine Nigerian religious and community leaders based in England. The interviews were conducted between May 2012 and April 2014, and data were analysed using thematic analysis technique. Findings: Three main themes were identified as factors influencing the disclosure and help-seeking practices of Nigerian (ethnic minority population) women in England, UK. These are socialisation from country of birth, immigration status, and acculturation in the country of immigration. These findings were discussed using the modified sociological theory of domestic violence and abuse. Conclusion: There is a need for appropriate gender socialisation, and collaborative working with ethnic minority community groups and faith-based organisations to enhance access and facilitate utilisation of existing domestic violence services by Nigerian (ethnic minority populations) women resident in England with lived experience of domestic violence and abuse.
Supervisor: Lovell, Karina ; Kendal, Sarah Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.689577  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Domestic Violence and Abuse ; Nigerian women ; Socialisation ; Immigration Status ; Acculturation ; England, UK ; Community groups ; Faith-Based Organisations ; Women ; Gender ; Ethnic Minority Populations
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