Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.689326
Title: Adopting nurturing and sensitive child rearing practices in Trinidad : an exploration
Author: Whiteman, Lesleann
ISNI:       0000 0004 5918 7471
Awarding Body: University of Sheffield
Current Institution: University of Sheffield
Date of Award: 2016
Availability of Full Text:
Access from EThOS:
Access from Institution:
Abstract:
This study deconstructed the nurturing child rearing strategies used by a group of ‘Trinidadian’ middle class parents and early childhood professionals to alter punitive intergenerational child rearing practices, and emphasised the significant contribution warm and responsive parent-child relationships made to children’s developmental outcomes. Framed within a postcolonial context, this thesis claims the main task of parenthood is to coach, mentor, and provide a pathway for future generations. The transference of punitive intergenerational parenting practices was examined to understand the significance of these practices and its effects on parent’s ability to develop warm and responsive relationships with their children. Interviews and focus groups with ten sets of parents examined the strategies they used to build a responsive parent-child relationship. The study also investigated the professional practices of four early childhood professionals in supporting parents through the emotional journey of developing intimate relationships with their children. The main findings of the research indicates that the parents and early childhood professionals used nurturing and sensitive child rearing practices, supported by a collaborative partnership to help them alter historical, political and socio-economic challenges within the ‘Trinbagonian’ society which contributed to the transference of punitive intergenerational parenting practices. This research contributes to the literature on nurturing and sensitive child rearing practices in Trinidad and Tobago, by highlighting the specific strategies used by my study participants, which are worthy of consideration in the wider domain to facilitate nurturing parent-child relationships, and contribute to beneficial developmental outcomes for children, their families, and the society.
Supervisor: Page, Jools Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ed.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.689326  DOI: Not available
Share: