Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.687953
Title: 'Taming wild tongues' : English-only approaches to language education and the impact on Latinos
Author: Avila, Becky Marie
ISNI:       0000 0004 5916 0973
Awarding Body: University of East Anglia
Current Institution: University of East Anglia
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
This thesis takes a critical look at the broader ideologies ensconced in English-Only approaches to English-language education and considers their impacts on Latino students, families, communities, and identities. Consistent with the objectives and methodologies found within Chicano Studies, this thesis is concerned primarily with eliminating racial hierarchies by decentralizing hegemonic practices that emphasize English monolingualism as a key signifier of American identity and as a primary goal of the U.S.’s educational system. In short, the thesis argues that English-Only methods of language instruction work to keep the boundaries of American identity protected, albeit narrowed, within a white and middle-class framework; and characterizes Latinos as a group whose culture and language lacks legitimacy within the United States. This has significant impacts not only on their education, but on their family life and representations within popular culture. To better understand the complicated nexus of race, ethnicity and class in which the debate over language education is situated, the thesis draws on recent developments in Language Studies and Critical Pedagogy to outline the relationship between social identity, language, power and education. This thesis is also an attempt to broaden the Chicano Studies tradition by emphasizing epistemology over subject matter. Widening the scope of Chicano Studies beyond a unique Chicano experience moves the tradition forward allowing researchers to effectively adopt a Chicano Studies framework for discussing other Latino ethnicities (Puerto Rican, Cuban, etc) and other minority language communities.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.687953  DOI: Not available
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