Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.686820
Title: An exploration of the experiences of young people with Asperger's Syndrome, their parents and their teachers in Irish mainstream secondary schools
Author: Killowry, Elaine
Awarding Body: University of Bristol
Current Institution: University of Bristol
Date of Award: 2015
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Abstract:
This study explores the experiences of young people with Asperger's Syndrome (AS), their parents and their teachers in Irish mainstream secondary schools. There is a lack of research that explores teachers' experiences of AS and there is no known study that considers the experiences of young people with AS or their parents within an Irish context. This study aimed to address an important gap within the Irish literature base. Three young-person-parent-teacher triads participated in this research. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with all nine participants and a drawing tool derived from Personal Construct Psychology was used to help elicit the voice of the young people with AS. As this study aimed to consider the experiences of the young people and the adults surrounding them, an Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) methodology was employed. The findings were analysed on an individual case-by-case basis due to the idiographic nature of IPA. Following this, master themes emerged by considering commonalities amongst the triads. These were: 'Barriers', 'Supports', 'Teacher Journey towards Understanding' and 'Scale of Parental Engagement'. These master themes fit within one over arching master theme of the whole study: 'Recognising the Individual'. The findings of the current study highlight the importance of the parents and teachers deepening their understanding of AS and recognising the young peoples' individual needs. Findings were applied to Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Systems Model (1979) as a framework for stakeholders to take account of when planning interventions. This study discusses the implications of these findings for young people, parents, teachers, schools and educational psychologists to consider.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.686820  DOI: Not available
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