Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.686440
Title: Sensors for monitoring wound healing
Author: McHugh, Jolene
ISNI:       0000 0004 5918 8343
Awarding Body: Ulster University
Current Institution: Ulster University
Date of Award: 2015
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Abstract:
Early identification of infection is imperative in the management of chronic wounds in preventing limb threatening events. There is a clear requirement for the development of in situ sensors that can monitor the healing progress of chronic wounds and identify the early onset of infection, providing the clinician with a more detailed picture of the wound dynamics. A variety of carbon composite materials were employed for use in wound monitoring technologies. The mechanical flexibility of the polyethylene and polycarbonate films are ideal for incorporation within existing dressing materials and could be produced in bulk at relatively low cost, a pre-requisite given the frequency with which dressings need to be replaced. Surface modification of the films through laser ablation and electrochemical anodisation was required to enhance the sensor's electroanalytical performance and improve both the selectivity and sensitivity towards uric acid - a key wound biomarker used to assess the wound physiology through measuring both the wound pH and wound severity. A preliminary assessment of the films performance in simulated wound fluid and defibrinated horse blood was conducted. A prototype smart bandage was designed, based on interfacing the carbon film to a portable potentiostat, and the response to urate and potential interferences assessed. The sensing strategies developed were adapted in order to facilitate the monitoring of central venous catheters which are also subject to the complications of infection. Carbon fibre filaments were selected as the core substrates for the sensing electrode due to their dimensional characteristics and as such could be easily integrated within existing catheter architectures.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.686440  DOI: Not available
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