Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.685708
Title: The nature of family-centred care in Thailand : a case study
Author: Yuennan, Choosak
ISNI:       0000 0004 5916 101X
Awarding Body: University of East Anglia
Current Institution: University of East Anglia
Date of Award: 2015
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Abstract:
Thalassemia is a long-term condition that is highly prevalent in children in northern Thailand and the management of this disease requires a strong input from families. Family-centred care is a key philosophy in the nursing care of children and their families, especially as parents play a key role in the health and well-being of a child. However, the concept of family-centred care is a western one and there is limited literature on its use in Thailand. The aim of this study is to explore the characteristics of family-centred care in one hospital in Thailand and the factors that influence the nature of the nursing care. Using a qualitative case study approach, data was collected by non-participant observations, semi-structured interviews of five families, four nurses, a medical doctor and a Buddhist monk and the analysis of documentation in 2010. The data was initially analysed deductively using a recognised framework of family-centred care and this was followed by a thematic inductive analysis. The results showed that all the elements of the framework of family-centred care existed in varying degrees although the concept was not recognised as shaping the nature of this care. The nature of this care was influenced by three factors: the family, the hospital and Thai culture with its strong religious traditions. These factors were incorporated into a model of family-centred care that could be applied to other institutions in Thailand. This study has shown that the family-centred care model is practiced but it requires a strong commitment and input from healthcare professionals. Strengthening and formalising the use of this concept can be a very useful strategy to ensure that the needs of the child and family are recognised, valued and met.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.685708  DOI: Not available
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