Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.685638
Title: Formation for ordained ministry in the Church of England : with special reference to a regional training course
Author: Groom, Susan Anne
ISNI:       0000 0004 5915 7192
Awarding Body: Durham University
Current Institution: Durham University
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
The word ‘formation’ has been increasingly employed in the context of training for ordination over the last fifty years, yet it has rarely been defined. In order to explore the meaning of formation, this thesis investigates the Church of England’s understanding of ordained ministry as expressed in its liturgy and official documents (Chapter 1); it surveys the history of training for that ministry over the last two hundred years (Chapter 2); and it traces the use of the language of formation in official Church of England publications (Chapter 3). Within the literature about theological education, there is much discussion about formation. However, there is little mention of the perspective of those in training for ordained ministry. Through the empirical study of one regional training course, using the method of critical conversation (Chapter 4), this research adds the contribution of the perspectives of those in training to that discussion (Chapter 5). To this end, the participants’ understanding of formation is considered in conversation with educational theories, specifically Mezirow’s transformative learning theory (Chapter 6); their experiences of formation are recounted with an examination of the biblical metaphors they employ (Chapter 7); and their understanding of the ministerial priesthood for which they were being prepared is scrutinized with the differences in understanding between the Church of England and the ordinands being noted (Chapter 8). The conclusion suggests a definition of formation within the context of training for ordination in the Church of England for further discussion, it notes some implications for the Church arising from this research, and suggests some areas for further study.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Th.M.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.685638  DOI: Not available
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