Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.685496
Title: Adaptation to multiple radial optic flows
Author: Dassy, Brice
ISNI:       0000 0004 5915 2244
Awarding Body: Cardiff University
Current Institution: Cardiff University
Date of Award: 2015
Availability of Full Text:
Access through EThOS:
Access through Institution:
Abstract:
There is long-standing evidence suggesting that our visual system can adapt to new visual environments, like a single radial optic flow generated when driving (Brown, 1931; Denton, 1966). In fact, as we move through the environment multiple optic flows can be generated. For example, when driving, we are often exposed to more than one radial optic flow at the same time. In this thesis I investigate whether the visual system can simultaneously adapt to two radial motion optic flows. More specifically, I explored this issue in three ways. First, I investigated whether the visual system could – through a fast low-level process – adapt to two optic flows present at two specific locations in space. Second, I probed whether the visual system could – through a perceptual learning process – learn to associate two radial optic flows with their locations in space. Third, I examined whether the visual system could – through a perceptual learning process – learn to associate each of two radial optic flows with preceding eye-movements. With regard to the first issue, the results from Experiments 1 – 6 suggested following exposure to two radial motion stimuli, a fast low-level process in the visual system could adapt to a radial flow pattern at one location in space: the radial flow pattern generated by the most recently presented radial motion stimulus. With respect to the second issue, the results from Experiments 7 – 10 indicated that the visual system could not learn to associate specific locations with two different radial motion stimuli. Finally, regarding the third issue, the results from Experiment 11 suggest that the visual system can associate specific eye-movements with two different radial motion stimuli. Taken together, these results suggest constraints on the way in which the visual system can adapt to radial motion, and emphasize the importance of self-movement in generating adaption to new visual environments.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.685496  DOI: Not available
Keywords: BF Psychology
Share: