Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.682866
Title: Bio-integrative polymer surfaces
Author: Biggs, Caroline Imogen
ISNI:       0000 0004 5915 1794
Awarding Body: University of Warwick
Current Institution: University of Warwick
Date of Award: 2015
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Abstract:
Protein-carbohydrate interactions mediate a diverse range of biological responses including pathogen-cell adhesion. In this age of decreased antibiotic discovery and increased antibiotic resistance, the study of protein-carbohydrate interactions is crucial to improve our understanding of pathogen-host interactions and surface bound carbohydrates, glycoarrays, offer a powerful tool towards furthering knowledge in this area. These concepts and current glycoarray methodologies are described in Chapter One. This thesis aims to develop glycan immobilisation techniques both directly and using polymeric tethers. Acrylate silane linkers are used to immobilise thiol-terminated monosaccharides by thiol-ene “click”, as described in Chapter Two. These immobilised glycans are then used to interrogate lectin-carbohydrate interactions. In Chapter Three the synthesis of poly(oligo(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate)s (pOEGMA)s and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)s (pNIPAM)s, by reversible addition fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerisation is presented. The reduction of the terminal thiocarbonylthio group was explored for thiol-ene surface modifications and thiol-gold reactions. The resulting polymer coatings are characterised and a detailed Quartz Crystal Microbalance study compares their grafting. In Chapter Four, the concepts of glycan immobilisation and polymer grafting are combined and glycan-terminated polymers are synthesised, surface grafted and used to explore protein-carbohydrate interactions. The thesis concludes with the direct contact printing of high density arrays of glycosylated polymers, showing the potential of this technique as a screening tool to monitor these biologically relevant processes.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.682866  DOI: Not available
Keywords: QD Chemistry
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