Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.681133
Title: Student nurses, stigma and infectious diseases : a mixed methods study
Author: Ashby, Nichola Jane
Awarding Body: University of Birmingham
Current Institution: University of Birmingham
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
Individuals or groups will form impressions of another based upon a series of traits, which may be relied upon when forming behaviour pattern towards others (Asch, 1946; Crocker and Major, 1989; Pinel, 1999; Albon, 2002; Corrigan and Wassel, 2008). These traits will depict the reception individuals receive within healthcare and may depend upon learnt and inherited ‘perceived’ ideals affecting the working and personal relationships experienced by positively diagnosed healthcare workers, predisposing stigma responses to others (Asch, 1946). A mixed method study investigating the potential existence of stigmatising values from student nurses towards positively diagnosed healthcare workers with Pulmonary Tuberculosis (PTB), Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA), Hepatitis C and Diabetes type 2, was undertaken. Analysis provided exploration of the stigmatising attitudes and values of 482 student nurses undertaking an education programme. Interpretation of the findings explored the participants views at course commencement, midpoint and completion considering variables of education (theoretical and clinical), personal and professional influences. Findings indicated that stigmatising values and attitudes return to those identified precourse and underpin the need for implementation of a change to nurse education within this area. The development of a longitudinal education model for healthcare workers considering disease processes and influencing factors psychologically, socially and physically, will provide opportunities to reduce the existence of stigmatisation for positively diagnosed healthcare workers.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.681133  DOI: Not available
Keywords: RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine ; RT Nursing
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