Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.680461
Title: The interaction between music and language in learning and recall in children with autism spectrum condition
Author: Reece, Adam
ISNI:       0000 0004 5915 8275
Awarding Body: University of Roehampton
Current Institution: University of Roehampton
Date of Award: 2015
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Abstract:
A study was carried out to examine the interaction between music and language in learning and recall in children with autism spectrum condition (ASC). The research comprised initial interviews (N=12), a questionnaire (N=320), and a comparative intervention with children with ASC (N=24), and a comparison group of neurotypical individuals (N=32). Results from the questionnaire showed that, in the view of parents and teachers, there was a high prevalence of singing amongst children with ASC, especially in those with language delay. Furthermore, in the view of parents and teachers, music was more likely to enhance relationships for children with some language delay (as opposed to children who were non-verbal and children with age- appropriate speech). In the practical phase of the study, where children were asked to learn and subsequently recall both spoken and sung material, it was found that singing as opposed to speaking could enhance verbal recall for some children with ASC - particularly those with some language delay. With regard to the effects of language on melodic recall, for children with the lowest levels of musical development, the presence of language had a positive effect, but as the level of children’s musical development increased, the impact of language on melodic recall diminished. With regard to the comparison group, for children at Key Stage 1 (5-7 year olds), music had a positive effect on verbal recall in the long term, but for children at Key Stage 2 (8 -11 year olds), music had a negative effect, although this may have been due to external factors.
Supervisor: Ockelford, Adam ; Marshall, Nigel Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Thesis
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.680461  DOI: Not available
Keywords: music ; language ; education ; autism
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