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Title: Performing Protestantism : the representations of Protestant, Unionist, and Loyalist identities in selected Northern Irish drama
Author: Minogue, M. W.
ISNI:       0000 0004 5372 6120
Awarding Body: Queen's University Belfast
Current Institution: Queen's University Belfast
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
This dissertation discusses the work of three Northern Irish playwrights: Stewart Parker, Christina Reid, and Gary Mitchell. Specifically, it examines the Protestant, unionist, and loyalist identities of the characters within their plays. During the Troubles and post-Good Friday Agreement era, during which these plays were written and performed, such identities were in flux, as the socio-political landscape of Northern Ireland was undergoing a volatile and violent upheaval. Chapter One discusses the roles and identities of the main ' actors ' in the Troubles: paramilitaries, the police, the British Army, and politicians. This chapter examines the identities of such actors themselves, and also their interactions with the civilians of the province. Chapter Two focuses on the performance of masculinities, and has its basis in contemporary theories of Western masculinities. The specific performance of Northern Irish masculinities is examined, as well as the potential for future masculinities posited by these playwrights. Chapter Three turns its attention to the roles of women in Northern Ireland and their representations on stage in the works of Parker, Reid, and Mitchell. The political, social, and cultural mores of the province are examined in detail, as it is these conditions to which the playwrights, and their works, are reacting against. Chapter Four examines the works for radio and television by Parker, Reid, and Mitchell. Within these mediums, these authors are able to more effectively write against media stereotypes perpetuated by news footage and inadequate reporting from the province, allowing their audiences to see the 'reality' of the everyday lives of Northern Irish men and women.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.680055  DOI: Not available
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