Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.676933
Title: Investigating the differential role of cognitive and affective characteristics associated with depressive symptomatology and callous-unemotional traits in adolescents engaging in externalising and antisocial behaviours
Author: Smith, Laura Jean
Awarding Body: King's College London
Current Institution: King's College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
Adolescents engaging in externalising and antisocial behaviour form a heterogeneous group. Despite diagnostic manuals including specifiers for subtypes (i.e. Depressive Conduct Disorder in ICD-10 and Callous Unemotional Traits in DSM-V), if an adolescent reaches threshold for a Conduct Disorder diagnosis, universal interventions are typically offered which may not take into account these differences. This study investigated the potentially differentiating characteristics associated with depressive symptomatology and callous unemotional traits in a sample of adolescents engaging in externalising and antisocial behaviour. Sixty-eight adolescents participated in the study from four Pupil Referral Units (PRU’s) across London. Depressive symptomatology was positively associated with rumination, low self-esteem and potentially feelings of shame, with regression analysis demonstrating that low self-esteem was the strongest predictor. Higher levels of callous unemotional traits were negatively associated with empathy, guilt, low self-esteem and potentially rumination. Regression analysis demonstrated that a lack of guilt (reparative behaviour), affective empathy and low self-esteem were the strongest predictors of callous unemotional traits. Overall low self-esteem was the strongest predictor of engagement in delinquent behaviour. The clinical implications for treatment are discussed.
Supervisor: Tranah, Troy Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.676933  DOI: Not available
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