Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.676516
Title: The role and effect of violence on the Ulster Defence Regiment in South Armagh
Author: Herron, S. W.
ISNI:       0000 0004 5372 9575
Awarding Body: Queen's University Belfast
Current Institution: Queen's University Belfast
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
This thesis explores the role and effect of 'Troubles'-related violence on soldiers who belonged to the Ulster Defence Regiment and served in the geographical area of South Annagh. Research into the actions of the UDR, a regiment of the British Army, but whose membership lived and operated in Northern Ireland, provides a mumber of insights into the variety of definitions, range of approaches, and array of explanations which can be applied to the study of violence. The experiences of soldiers living and operating in South Armagh, an area situated beside the border with the Republic of Ireland and closely associated with high levels of insurgent violence during the Troubles, provides a foundation upon which to demonstrate violence as a concept whose complexity and multilayered characteristics are matched by that which is dynamic, engaging and ultimately compelling. This thesis focuses, on both the extraordinary, and those seemingly mundane, ordinary ways in which violence is lived and experienced. This is achieved by analysing a range of areas, from the training processes undertaken by new recruits to turn them into a proficient soldier and the symbolic and ritual characteristics of military operations, to the traumatic experiences arising from conflict engagement and the role of veterans' organisations in shaping soldiers post~conflict recovery and recollections. Therefore, by placing violence in the centre of the lives of those exposed to it, and by focusing on the subjective, experiential realities of conflict, illustrates how violence must be analysed and understood beyond its physical aspect, encompassing social., cultural and ideological features, since it is such dimensions which give violence its power, meaning and ultimate expression.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.676516  DOI: Not available
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