Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.676493
Title: Electrocatalysis towards direct fuel cell applications
Author: Hamer, P.
ISNI:       0000 0004 5372 9380
Awarding Body: Queen's University Belfast
Current Institution: Queen's University Belfast
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
The aim of this thesis is an in depth study of electro-oxidation of ethanol, but also that of alternate fuels to allow a direct comparison under a range of conditions. Polycrystalline metal electrodes are used in a half cell set up as model environment for the electrochemical studies of several catalytic surfaces. Due to the limited research that has been carried out, for the first time chapters 3 and 4 of the thesis provide electrochemical studies into the electro oxidation of ethanol, ethylene glycol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid on polycrystalline rhodium while simultaneously studying temperature, concentration and electrolyte. Chapter 5 investigates the effect of changing platinum coverage on the surface of polycrystalline rhodium on of ethanol electro-oxidation while also changing temperature and concentration. To the best of my knowledge this is an experiment never before carried out and clearly shows the effect of the varying platinum coverage under a range of conditions. Chapters 6&7 investigate electro-oxidation of C2 molecules on polycrystalline platinum again with varying concentration, temperature and electrolyte. Although Chapter 1 shows similar experiments have been carried out before, using the same electrode for all experiments as well as investigating the effect of varying tin coverage on the platinum surface allows for direct comparisons, as well as providing results to compare with the results of the rhodium experiments. Overall, this thesis provides a systematic and comprehensive study into the electrochemical oxidation of ethanol and other C2 molecules using cyclic voltammetry and chrono amperometry techniques to provide activity and stability information to a degree not reported anywhere else.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.676493  DOI: Not available
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