Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.675565
Title: The Clinton Administration's Russia policy (1993-1997) : misperceptions, networks, bureaucratic politics, and temporal effects
Author: Hand, Robert W.
ISNI:       0000 0004 5371 4613
Awarding Body: University of Aberdeen
Current Institution: University of Aberdeen
Date of Award: 2015
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Abstract:
This thesis examines the first post-Soviet interplay between the US and Russia—the Clinton Administration's policy toward Russia from 1993 to 1997 (the “Clinton Policy”). The thesis uses Rational Action Theory and a unique combination of widely-proven and accepted perspectives on US presidential administration bureaucratic processes, presidential decision-making, political elite perceptions, the effects of bureaucratic organisation on policy decisions, and temporal effects to examine this critical point in US foreign policy. The thesis validates the point of view that the Clinton Policy was formulated and implemented with a myopic view of both Yeltsin and Russia as a result of personal histories and bias, bureaucratic inertia, and temporal dynamics. It further highlights that the Clinton Administration continued to resource and reinforce this unsuccessful policy despite objective indicators that its trajectory was not as desired or predicted. In a broader context, the thesis suggests that future US presidential administrations seeking to influence another country at so deep a level as to effect a major socio-political and structural change such as the implementation of democracy must have a significant resolve and commitment for an extended period, an initial and continuing assessment of the affected nation that is as complete and impartial as possible, and the mechanisms and will to discontinue an unsuccessful policy.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.675565  DOI: Not available
Keywords: United States ; Russia
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