Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.675044
Title: Underestimation of body weight and its associated factors among trainee healthcare professionals : a cross-sectional study in Pakistan
Author: Mahmood, Sajid
ISNI:       0000 0004 5370 4845
Awarding Body: University of Sheffield
Current Institution: University of Sheffield
Date of Award: 2015
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Abstract:
Background: Underestimation of body weight is one of the barriers to the prevention of overweight and obesity. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of underestimation of body weight and its associated factors among trainee healthcare professionals (HCPs). Methodology: A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted in Karachi. Data were collected from the undergraduate students of medicine, dentistry, physiotherapy, pharmacy and nursing through self-administered questionnaires, followed by anthropometric measurements. Actual weight categories were defined using South Asian body mass index (BMI) cut-off points. Underestimation of body weight occurred if participants self-reported a lower weight category than their actual measured weight category. Logistic regression was used to determine the factors associated with underestimation of body weight. Results: A total of 2,114 students participated. The mean (±SD) age of participants was 20.6±2.4 years. Thirty percent of participants were overweight or obese, whereas 23% were underweight. Over seventy five percent of the participants did not know their BMI value. The overall prevalence of underestimation of body weight was 36.6%. Men were more likely to underestimate their body weight than women [OR=3.11 (95%C.I: 2.30-4.21)]. Compared to normal weight individuals, overweight and obese individuals were more likely to underestimate weight [OR=9.45 (95%C.I: 7.28-12.25)]. Compared to self-measured weight, participants who obtained weight knowledge from others were more likely to underestimate their weight [OR=1.38 (95%C.I: 1.02-1.87)]. Participants who received weight-related comments from parents [OR=1.56 (95%C.I: 1.19-2.03)], and friends [OR=1.46 (95% C.I: 1.12-1.92)] were more likely to underestimate their weight. Similarly, an increase in the number of siblings also increased the likelihood of underestimation of body weight [OR=1.12 (95% C.I: 1.03-1.23)]. Conclusion: High prevalence of underestimation of body weight suggests the need for a future curriculum that would educate trainee HCPs about healthy weight and accurate weight assessment methods to bring positive behavioural change.
Supervisor: Relton, Clare ; Croot, Elizabeth ; Freeman, Jennifer Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.675044  DOI: Not available
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