Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.669665
Title: Folk kan synge hit bet than I : the medievalism of English folkmusic, 1750-2013
Author: Byers, Kevin Byers
ISNI:       0000 0004 5369 3314
Awarding Body: Queen's University Belfast
Current Institution: Queen's University Belfast
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
In this thesis, I examine the ways in which English folkmusic has interacted with medievalism from the eighteenth century to the present day. In Chapter 1, I use the story of how Thomas Percy discovered his famous manuscript as a frame for exploring the history of folkmusic from the Middle Ages to the eighteenth century and the medieval discourses employed by editors of folksong such as Thomas Percy and Francis James Child. In Chapter 2, I examine the activities of the first folk revival and its cultural influence from the late 1800s to the end of the First World War, with particular attention to the work of Lucy Broadwood, Sabine Baring-Gould, Ralph Vaughan Williams and Cecil Sharp. In Chapter 3 I explore the impact of folkmusic on English culture in the aftermath of the First World War, considering the importance of folkmusic and medievalism to F. R. Leavis and the Scmti'!)l movement, as well as in the pageant form, in both literature and film. In Chapter 4 I look at the origins of the second folk revival in the activities of Fascists and Communists from the 1920s to . the 1940s, paying particular attention to the work of Rolf Gardiner and A. L. lloyd. In Chapter 5, I explore the ways in which folkmusic and medievalism intertwined in the work of musicians such as Shirley and Dolly Collins and Steeleye Span in the 1960s and 1970s and discuss the importance of follmmsic in the depiction of the Middle Ages on film and television. In Chapter 6, I examine the exploitation of the Middle Ages by folkmusicians in the 1980s for historical precedents to contemporary political concerns. In Chapter 7, I consider the impact of remix culture on the interaction of folkmusic and medievalism from the 1990s to the present day.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.669665  DOI: Not available
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