Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.668378
Title: The psychosocial outcome of anoxic brain injury following cardiac arrest
Author: Wilson, Michelle
Awarding Body: University of Lincoln
Current Institution: University of Lincoln
Date of Award: 2012
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Abstract:
Aim of the study The psychosocial outcome of anoxic brain injury following cardiac arrest is a relatively under researched, but clinically important area. The aim of the current study was to add to the limited existing literature exploring the psychosocial outcome for cardiac arrest survivors, but specifically explore if there is a greater impact on psychosocial outcome in individuals experiencing anoxic brain injury as a result. Methods A range of self report measures were used to compare the quality of life, social functioning and symptoms of anxiety, depression and post traumatic stress of individuals with and without anoxic brain injury following cardiac arrest. Measures of subjective memory and executive difficulties were also used to investigate whether psychosocial difficulties were associated with subjective cognitive difficulties. Participants took part in the study between six months and four years post cardiac arrest. A MANOVA was used as a primary method of analysis. Results There was a significant multivariate difference between the two groups; with individuals with anoxia reporting more psychosocial difficulties than the nonanoxia group. Participants in the anoxia group had more social functioning difficulties and more anxiety, depression and post traumatic stress symptoms. There was no significant difference in self-reported quality of life between the two groups, although better quality of life was associated with better social functioning and fewer anxiety, depression and post traumatic stress symptoms. Although there was no significant difference between the two groups in regard to self-reported cognitive difficulties, fewer reported difficulties were also significantly associated with better quality of life, better social functioning and fewer anxiety, depression and post traumatic stress symptoms. There was no significant association with psychosocial outcome and time since cardiac arrest and no significant gender differences. Conclusion As the first known study to compare outcome for cardiac arrest survivors with anoxia with those without, the results suggest psychosocial outcome is worse for individuals with anoxia. Individuals with anoxia experience significantly more social functioning difficulties and symptoms of anxiety, depression and post traumatic stress. It is suggested that the difference is due to a combination of neuropsychological, social and psychological factors resulting from anoxic brain injury following cardiac arrest, however further research is required to explore the contributing factors in more depth.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.668378  DOI: Not available
Keywords: C840 Clinical Psychology
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