Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.667974
Title: Older men's experience of moving into residential care
Author: Weighell, Simon
ISNI:       0000 0004 5364 4061
Awarding Body: University of East London
Current Institution: University of East London
Date of Award: 2015
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Abstract:
Research examining the transition into residential aged care suggests that it can have a significant psychological and physiological impact upon older adults. There is a dearth of research examining the specific experiences of older men moving into and living in residential aged care. Older men may be at a significant disadvantage in managing the transition into care, particularly in context to; institutional living often characterised by increased dependency and a loss of control; physical disability and frailty; a feminised environment; and difficulties establishing supportive relationships. This study sought to explore the experiences of men who have moved into a ‘residential care home’. This is paramount for understanding the needs of this group and attending to gaps in the literature. Eight care home residents were interviewed with regards to their experiences of moving into a care home. A thematic analysis of these interviews was constructed. Four themes were found: ‘Different roads same destination’, ‘The systems (at) work’, ‘Making it easier’, and ‘It’s harder to connect’. The analysis indicated that older men seek social support and intimacy in care but are prevented from meeting their needs because of individual and systemic barriers. Older men may use a distinct type of acceptance that is influenced by their cohort specific experiences to help them get used to institutional living. The thesis concludes with consideration of the wider professional and research implications.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.667974  DOI: Not available
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