Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.667890
Title: Youth offending teams : a grounded theory of the barriers and facilitators to young people's help seeking from mental health services
Author: Lane, Carla
ISNI:       0000 0004 5363 6969
Awarding Body: Canterbury Christ Church University
Current Institution: Canterbury Christ Church University
Date of Award: 2015
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Abstract:
Young people within the youth justice system experience three times higher rates of mental health problems than the general youth population yet are one of the least likely groups to seek help. Very little theory or research is available within this population to explain these high rates of unmet need. This study aimed to develop a theory about the barriers and facilitators that Youth Offending Team workers experience when supporting young people to access mental health services. Eleven semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants; eight youth offending team workers, two young people and a mental health worker. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim before being analysed using “grounded theory”. This method was chosen to allow the in depth exploration of participants experiences and the development of theory within an under researched area. The results showed that Youth Offending Team workers appeared to play a crucial role in supporting a young person’s help seeking from mental health services. A preliminary model was developed which demonstrated the complex relationships between six identified factors which influenced this role. The study concluded that Youth Offending Team workers would benefit from more support, training and recognition of the key role they play in supporting young people to become ready for a referral to mental health services. Mental health services could be well placed to provide this. Clinical implications are discussed. Further research is needed to develop our understanding of what influenced the help seeking of this vulnerable population.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.667890  DOI: Not available
Keywords: RA1148 Forensic psychology ; RA0790 Mental health services. Mental illness prevention ; RJ0503 Adolescent psychiatry
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