Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.667249
Title: Automatic ontology generation based on semantic audio analysis
Author: Kolozali, Sefki
ISNI:       0000 0004 5359 6047
Awarding Body: Queen Mary, University of London
Current Institution: Queen Mary, University of London
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
Ontologies provide an explicit conceptualisation of a domain and a uniform framework that represents domain knowledge in a machine interpretable format. The Semantic Web heavily relies on ontologies to provide well-defined meaning and support for automated services based on the description of semantics. However, considering the open, evolving and decentralised nature of the SemanticWeb – though many ontology engineering tools have been developed over the last decade – it can be a laborious and challenging task to deal with manual annotation, hierarchical structuring and organisation of data as well as maintenance of previously designed ontology structures. For these reasons, we investigate how to facilitate the process of ontology construction using semantic audio analysis. The work presented in this thesis contributes to solving the problems of knowledge acquisition and manual construction of ontologies. We develop a hybrid system that involves a formal method of automatic ontology generation for web-based audio signal processing applications. The proposed system uses timbre features extracted from audio recordings of various musical instruments. The proposed system is evaluated using a database of isolated notes and melodic phrases recorded in neutral conditions, and we make a detailed comparison between musical instrument recognition models to investigate their effects on the automatic ontology generation system. Finally, the automatically-generated musical instrument ontologies are evaluated in comparison with the terminology and hierarchical structure of the Hornbostel and Sachs organology system. We show that the proposed system is applicable in multi-disciplinary fields that deal with knowledge management and knowledge representation issues.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.667249  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Centre for Digital Music ; Electronic Engineering ; C4DM
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