Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.666990
Title: Models of primate supraretinal visual representations
Author: Mender, Bedeho M. W.
ISNI:       0000 0004 5358 8821
Awarding Body: University of Oxford
Current Institution: University of Oxford
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
This thesis investigates a set of non-classical visual receptive field properties observed in the primate brain. Two main phenomena were explored. The first phenomenon was neurons with head-centered visual receptive fields, in which a neuron responds maximally to a visual stimulus in the same head-centered location across all eye positions. The second phenomenon was perisaccadic receptive field dynamics, which involves a range of experimentally observed response behaviours of an eye-centered neuron associated with the advent of a saccade that relocates the neuron's receptive field. For each of these two phenomena, a hypothesis was proposed for how a neural circuit with a suitable initial architecture and synaptic learning rules could, when subjected to visually-guided training, develop the receptive field properties in question. Corresponding neural network models were first trained as hypothesized, and subsequently tested in conditions similar to experimental tasks used to interrogate the physiology of the relevant primate neural circuits. The behaviour of the models was compared to neurophysiological observations as a metric for their explanatory power. In both cases the neural network models were in broad agreement with experimental observations, and the operation of these models was studied to shed light on the neural processing behind these neural phenomena in the brain.
Supervisor: Maitland, Simon Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.666990  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Neuroscience ; Computational Neuroscience ; Vision ; Neural Networks ; Reference Frames
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