Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.666741
Title: An exploration of the psychological and emotional needs of pregnant women with female genital mutilation
Author: Higham, Victoria
ISNI:       0000 0004 5357 0410
Awarding Body: University of Liverpool
Current Institution: University of Liverpool
Date of Award: 2015
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Abstract:
Background: Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) may put women at additional physical risks during pregnancy, which may leave them psychologically vulnerable. Pregnancy and childbirth research with women with FGM has focused on the physical risks and the outcomes of pregnancy for mother and child (Paliwal, Ali, Bradshaw, Hughes & Jolly, 2013; Small et al., 2008; Zenner, Liao, Richens & Creighton, 2013; WHO, 2006). The psychological needs of pregnant women with FGM are under researched in the UK, or have relied on retrospective accounts given many years after pregnancy. Aims: To explore the psychological and emotional needs of pregnant women with FGM and their experience of FGM, pregnancy and pregnancy-related care. Methods: Seven pregnant women were interviewed using semi-structured interviews, which were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were analysed using Thematic Analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006). Results: Five main themes emerged, which related to how women made sense of their FGM procedure (The shame of FGM) and how this impacted on their experience of pregnancy (Suffering), as well as their experience of care during their pregnancy (women with FGM need to feel cared for, information sharing, and specialised/individual care). The study highlighted the profound suffering of pregnant women with FGM, in particular their fear of labour and birth. The study was limited as recruitment was from specialist FGM services; however, in doing so the need for specialist services, with professionals who are knowledgeable and experienced with FGM-related pregnancy care, was emphasised. Conclusions: The study added to the understanding of how pregnant women with FGM experience their pregnancy and their maternity care, identifying the crucial aspects of specialist FGM.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.666741  DOI: Not available
Keywords: BF Psychology ; RG Gynecology and obstetrics
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