Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.666214
Title: Stepping on untreaded waters : a grounded theory approach to paediatric nurses' experience of caring for young people who self-harm
Author: McGlynn, Tracy A.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2006
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Abstract:
The present study explores paediatric nurses’ experience of caring for young people who self-harm. The purpose is to identify the impact of caring for this patient group and the potential implications this has for patient care. It is estimated that between 20,000 and 30,000 young people present to hospitals in the UK with self-harm injuries each year. The current literature reveals that healthcare workers based in psychiatric and accident and emergency settings experiences a range of negative feelings when caring for adults who self-harm. Self-harm can challenge the value system of a nurse and raise issues regarding whether someone is deserving of the care. There is a scarcity of literature exploring paediatric nurses’ experience of caring for young people on a medical ward. A grounded theory approach was undertaken to meet the aims of this study. Eight paediatric nurses working in a hospital in the Scottish Highlands took part. The findings revealed one core category, ‘Stepping on untreaded waters’, which represented nurses’ sense of uncertainty. This category related to four main categories which described: the use of support mechanisms; knowledge of self-harm; nursing culture; factors which influence a nurse’s perception of being a ‘good nurse’. The core and main categories were related to three principal categories which were all formulated into a Model of Support Resources. The need for a sensitive, creative approach when introducing further education and training to nurses is critical, given the climate of change in nursing education.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.666214  DOI: Not available
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