Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.666126
Title: Obstetric complications and functional psychosis
Author: McConville, P.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2007
Availability of Full Text:
Full text unavailable from EThOS. Please contact the current institution’s library for further details.
Abstract:
The main body of the work is a study of the rates of obstetric complications in 492 patients meeting ICD-9 criteria for schizophrenia, affective disorder and other functional psychosis, compared to their 797 non-psychotic siblings and to 2,460 normal controls. The main results, for each of the three diagnostic groups, indicate significant confounding between obstetric complications, maternal marital status and social class. No single obstetric complication remained associated with schizophrenia once these factors had been controlled for. Bleeding in pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of affective disorder compared to controls. A low Apgar score at 5 minutes was associated with an increased risk of affective disorder compared to controls. Low social class and maternal marital status were also associated with the risk of affective disorder. Induction of labour or elective caesarean section was associated with an increased risk of other functional psychosis compared to their non-psychotic siblings. Secondary analyses of the effect of season of birth, age of onset of illness and family history are presented. Schizophrenic patients were more likely to have been born in winter than their siblings but winter-born schizophrenics had similar rates of OCs to those born at other times.  An induced labour or elective caesarean section was associated with an increased risk of affective disorder of early onset and of non-familial affective disorder. Bleeding in pregnancy was also associated with an increased risk of non-familial affective disorder. The findings are compared to those of other studies and conclusions are drawn about the importance of obstetric complications in the aetiology of psychotic disorders, with particular emphasis on schizophrenia, and suggestions are made for further research.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (M.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.666126  DOI: Not available
Share: