Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.665934
Title: Cosmopolitan fandom : a critical postcolonial analysis of Liverpool FC's supporters discourses in Brazil and Switzerland
Author: Petersen-Wagner, Renan
ISNI:       0000 0004 5352 2988
Awarding Body: Durham University
Current Institution: Durham University
Date of Award: 2015
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Abstract:
It is argued by different social researchers that the Western contemporaneous world is living under a different set of conditions than in the one that classical sociologist’s theorised. Taking a reflexive modern perspective through a cosmopolitan sociological imagination this thesis discussed how a particular socio-cultural manifestation was used discursively by individuals to understand their being and becoming in a globalised world. As argued in this thesis, football’s transnationalism provided supporters a locus for creating and expressing cosmopolitan identities that challenge the modern sociological imagination, particularly the one centred in the nation-state. My understanding of the modern sociological imagination impact on football fandom theorisations emerges from a critical analysis of the academic discourse on authentic supporters. As demonstrated in the thesis, the authentic supporter under a modern sociology is imagined as homogeneously male, white, working class, and especially local. Thus, based on an 18-month ethnographic inspired research on Liverpool FC’s supporters in Brazil and Switzerland the argument that emerges from this empirical research is fourfold: the cosmopolitan football flâneur should be conceptualised ambivalently governed by individualisation; instead of a Bastelbiographie, individualisation should be understood as a Dasein-für-Gewälthe-Andere, where those others are the re-modernised structures of modernity; cosmopolitanism does not render the nation-state obsolete as a Zombie-category, whereas it should be imagined as Frankensteins-monster; and Ulrich Beck’s notions of nationalism and cosmopolitanism should be understood as more real than real simulacras.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.665934  DOI: Not available
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