Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.665760
Title: Self-injurious behaviour in people with Prader-Willi syndrome
Author: Bull, Leah Elizabeth
ISNI:       0000 0004 5350 8000
Awarding Body: University of Birmingham
Current Institution: University of Birmingham
Date of Award: 2015
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Abstract:
Volume one contains a systematic literature review, an empirical chapter and a public domain briefing. The review explored the phenomenology of skin picking (a self-injurious behaviour) in people with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). A number of characteristics were well described with some areas of limited research, e.g. frequency and duration. Skin picking in people with PWS and in the typically developing population was compared showing that there were more similarities than differences. The empirical chapter further explored the phenomenology of skin picking in people with PWS and associated management techniques by using a semi-structured interview. Informants reported on the age of onset, frequency and duration of skin picking, type of skin picked, damage caused, antecedents and the influence of pain. The most common management strategy used by parents and carers was distraction and the majority of participants with PWS did not have their own management strategy to try to reduce skin picking. Results of both chapters are discussed within the context of previous research and the clinical implications are considered. Volume two contains five clinical practice reports conducted at various mental health services; a models essay, a service evaluation, a single case experimental design and two case studies.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.665760  DOI: Not available
Keywords: BF Psychology ; RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
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