Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.665211
Title: Development of new materials for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells
Author: Petit, Christophe T. G.
Awarding Body: University of Strathclyde
Current Institution: University of Strathclyde
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
In this thesis, the main focus of the work is the development of novel materials for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs) with an aim of showing suitability and compatibility with fuel cell system environment. Fuel cell fabrication was briefly encountered to test appropriateness with existing fuel cell element standards (yttrium-doped zirconia as electrolyte for high temperature operation and gadoliniumdoped ceria for IT-SOFCs) but due to the lack of appropriate component, extensive tests to determine full potential were not carried out. Methods such as solid-state reaction and sol-gel process were adopted for the synthesis of the materials and solid-solution limits were determined for the orthovanadate compounds studied. These latter were then reduced to their metavanadate counterpart in order to establish a possible cyclability between the two oxygenated forms that could be exploited in fuel cell mechanisms. Doped version of the former and latter with alkaline-earth elements were found to greatly increase stability and conductive behaviour while maintaining appropriate densification through the formation of closed pores in the orthovanadate structure allowing the metavanadate to benefit from increased conductance. Electrolyte studies were also carried out based on doped barium yttrium cerate/zirconate structures however compounds synthesised exhibited inappropriate properties for use in IT-SOFCs despite some interesting behaviours that would be a benefit in high-temperature electrolysers.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.665211  DOI: Not available
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