Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.665191
Title: 'True receivers': Rilke and the contemporary poetics of listening (Part 1) ; Poems: Small weather (Part 2)
Author: Lawrence, Faith
ISNI:       0000 0004 5347 4218
Awarding Body: University of St Andrews
Current Institution: University of St Andrews
Date of Award: 2015
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Abstract:
Part 1: ‘True Receivers': Rilke and the Contemporary Poetics of Listening In this part of this thesis I argue that a contemporary ‘poetics of listening' has emerged in the UK, and explore the writing of three of our most significant poets - John Burnside, Kathleen Jamie and Don Paterson - to find out why they have become interested in the idea of the poet as a ‘listener'. I suggest that the appeal of this listening stance accounts for their engagement with the poetry of Rainer Maria Rilke, who thought of himself as a listening ‘receiver'; it is proposed that Rilke's notion of ‘receivership' and the way his poems relate to the earthly (or the ‘non-human') also account for the general ‘intensification' of interest in his work. An exploration of the shifting status of listening provides context for this study, and I pay particular attention to the way innovations in audio and communications technology influenced Rilke's late sequences the Duino Elegies and The Sonnets to Orpheus. A connection is made between Rilke's ‘listening poetics' and the ‘listening' stance of Ted Hughes and Edward Thomas; this establishes a ‘listening lineage' for the contemporary poets considered in the thesis. I also suggest that there are intriguing similarities between the ideas of listening that are emerging in contemporary poetics and Hélène Cixous' concept of ‘écriture féminine'. Exploring these similarities helps us to understand the implications of the stance of the poet-listener, which is a counter to the idea that as a writer you must ‘find your voice'. Finally, it is proposed that ‘a poetics of listening' would benefit from an enriched taxonomy. Part 2 of the thesis is a collection of my poems entitled ‘Small Weather'.
Supervisor: Paterson, Don Sponsor: Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.665191  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Listening ; Poetics ; Rainer Maria Rilke ; Ecopoetics ; Don Paterson ; Kathleen Jamie ; John Burnside ; Edward Thomas ; Phonograph ; Listening taxonomy ; Sound ; History of listening ; A poetics of listening ; Receivership ; Hélène Cixous ; The sonnets to Orpheus ; 'Finding your voice' ; Martin Heidegger ; Maurice Merleau-Ponty ; Jean-Luc Nancy ; Embarrassment ; Duino elegies ; Primal sound ; Ted Hughes ; PN1042.L288 ; Poetics ; Listening in literature ; Rilke ; Rainer Maria ; 1875-1926--Criticism and interpretation ; Burnside ; John ; 1955- --Criticism and interpretation ; Jamie ; Kathleen ; 1962- --Criticism and interpretation ; Paterson ; Don ; 1963- --Criticism and interpretation
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