Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.665113
Title: Ordinary & extraordinary resistances : the struggle for land and space by the Palestinian citizens of Israel
Author: Plonski, Sharri
ISNI:       0000 0004 5346 8600
Awarding Body: SOAS, University of London
Current Institution: SOAS, University of London
Date of Award: 2015
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Abstract:
This thesis explores the dialectic relationship between 'power' and 'resistance' through the lens of the struggle for land and space, by the Palestinian citizens of Israel. Ever in contention, ever in conversation, dynamics of power and resistance dislodge, dislocate and displace one another, transformed through their intersections and interactions. Thus to understand Palestinian-citizen struggle is to see it in dialogue with the trajectories of the Israeli hegemonic order: in which the indigenous Palestinian is always othered, outside and absent; a threat to be removed and replaced, despite (or even because of) their inclusion in the political and spatial organisations of the state. There is no room for the indigenous Palestinian within the state's dual rationales of ethnic-nationalism and settler-colonialism. And yet, there is a never-ending encounter between the Zionist state and subaltern Palestinian-citizen, essential to the shape and journey of both. This encounter produces the particular story, the particular space, in which both are housed, the lines and boundaries of which are articulated and disrupted through unique spatial and social relations. The analysis stems from a three year exploration of three cases of community land-struggles: a popular movement for housing rights in Palestinian neighbourhoods of Jaffa-Tel Aviv; an enduring protest-movement against the Judaization project in the Galilee region; and the existential struggle for land rights of Bedouin communities in the Naqab desert. Their stories are a window into the unique reverberations of Zionist hegemony as it clashes with a real, contextualised, material history; with a Palestinian community surviving, resisting, antagonising and engaging the structures of power. Through investigating their moments of containment, contention and transgression, we unravel how resistance is entangled with the structures of power; and how the lines that determine this relationship are challenged, unveiled and disarticulated, and even transcended and transformed.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.665113  DOI: Not available
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