Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.665060
Title: The making of an Ottoman port-city : the state, local elites and urban space in Salonika, 1870-1912
Author: Dimitriadis, Sotirios
Awarding Body: SOAS, University of London
Current Institution: SOAS, University of London
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
My dissertation aims at giving an account of the late Ottoman city of Salonica and its establishment as a major urban and commercial centre in the period between 1870 and 1912. As such, it follows the growing debate on late Ottoman history, and in particular the role of the empire's port-cities. My study focuses on the emergence of two distinct local elites: The Ottoman provincial officialdom, whose presence was being increasingly felt, as the Tanzimat, the nineteenth-century Ottoman reforms progressed; and a diverse local bourgeoisie that took advantage of the opportunities presented by the integration of the region within the commercial networks that crisscrossed the Mediterranean. Urban governance was grounded upon a consensus between these two groups. It was structured around a hegemonic discourse of modernisation, semi-representative structures of local administration, as well as the profits generated by a nascent real estate market - itself a product of urban expansion and renovation. This balance was placed into doubt in the beginning of the twentieth century. As tensions in Macedonia escalated into ethnic conflict, the Young Turk Revolution of 1908 promised to redraft the contract between the Ottoman state and society on a more equitable and inclusive basis. In the process, however, the social forces in the city were unable to manage the radical expansion of public space. The old elite arrangements were swept aside by the introduction of mass politics, and the sites that symbolised the modernisation of Salonica became sites of contestation. The defeat of the Ottoman army in the First Balkan War and the annexation of Salonica and part of its hinterland by Greece marked the final demise of the Ottoman city.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.665060  DOI: Not available
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