Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.664290
Title: "It's like getting your wee boy back" : exploring the efficacy of using video interaction guidance to improve parent-child relationships in families where children's needs are being neglected
Author: Macdonald, Maeve
Awarding Body: Queen's University Belfast
Current Institution: Queen's University Belfast
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
Background: Short-term interventions involving video-feedback have been found to be effective in enhancing parental sensitivity in maltreating families'. Video Interaction Guidance (VIG) is a relationship-based intervention in which clients are guided to reflect on video clips of their own successful interactions. Aims: This research aims to explore the experiences of parents participating in a VIG programme and the impact of VIG on parental sensitivity and attunement, mind-minded interactions and parental mentalisation in families where there are concerns about child neglect. Sample: Four parent - child dyads were recruited during VIG programmes carried out by the NSPCC in Northern Ireland under its 'Neglect Theme'. Methods: A multiple-case study design was used, with qualitative and quantitative methods employed. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with parents within two weeks of the programme completion and analysed using Thematic Analysis. Recordings of parent - child interactions and shared reviews from three phases across the VIG programme were collected. Video analysis was conducted on parent - child interactions to record number of attuned, discordant and . missed responses, and number of mind-minded interactions. Video analysis was conducted of twenty minutes of the shared reviews to record the number of parental mentalisation comments. Results: Parents reported that VIG enhanced their sense of self as parents and their relationships with their children. Practical and interpersonal aspects of VIG were identified as explanations for its success. Quantitative data failed to provide substantial evidence for the impact of VIG on parental sensitivity and attunement, mind-minded interactions and parental mentalisation. Conclusions: Practical and interpersonal aspects of VIG explain its efficacy as an intervention to improve relationships in families where children's needs are being neglected.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.664290  DOI: Not available
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