Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.664085
Title: Art and reflexivity in post-1960 European cinema
Author: Yacavone, D.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2006
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Abstract:
This thesis explores the use and influence of painting in post-1960 European cinema as it relates to a host of reflexive practices which, through either their adoption or rejection, help to define “modernist” film. The formal and thematic presence of painting in the films of key European auteurs (Jean-Luc Godard, Andrei Tarkovsky, Peter Greenaway, Raul Ruiz, Jacques Rivette and Werner Herzog, among others) is analysed with reference to a number of theoretical perspectives, including but not limited to, those provided by Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology of art and perception, André Bazin’s realist film theory, and Clement Greenberg’s neo-formalist art theory. Within a post-1960 context, a basic distinction is made between cinematically reflexive and a-reflexive/transparent films, as the products of what is defined as “seeing-with cinema” filmmaking and “seeing-through cinema” filmmaking, respectively. Among the films of each general type that substantially incorporate painting (in the form of the representation of individual works and/or as a subject matter), an analogy is drawn between their dominant reflexive or a-reflexive tendencies and, firstly, the choice of art works or styles cited, and secondly, the differing ways in which this art is presented on screen. This analogy is tested via an in-depth study of art in the prototypically reflexive films of Jean-Luc Godard (as well as the multi-faceted relations between Godard’s mid-to-late 1960’s cinema and American Pop art painting), followed by an analysis of the representation of painting in Andrei Tarkovsky’s cinema, as it’s a-reflexive stylistic counter-point.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.664085  DOI: Not available
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