Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.663522
Title: A pilot study investigating the effectiveness of a stand alone cognitive behavioural body image group for patients with bulimia nervosa and eating disorder not otherwise specified
Author: Watson, C. L.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2009
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Abstract:
Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a six week body image group, specifically designed for patients with bulimia nervosa and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) prior to receiving routine treatment. The group aimed to improve satisfaction, attitudes, behaviours and checking cognitions. It also aimed to reduce eating disorder symptomatology. Design: A between subjects controlled repeated measures design was used. Method: 12 participants were recruited to take part across two body image groups that included components of CBT for body image disturbance. Participants attended six weekly group sessions and also carried out homework activities and mindfulness practice. Measures were administered pre and post treatment, to both the body image and waiting list control group. Results: At post treatment, there were significant improvements in body satisfaction and body checking cognitions in group participants. The remaining body image dimensions and eating disorder symptomatology did not show any significant change, however, there were observed decreases on all of these outcomes in the body image group. Qualitative responses suggested that participants had fewer body concerns and more positive/accepting body image thoughts at post treatment. In the control group condition there was no significant change on any outcome measure during a six week period. Conclusion: The findings suggest that a stand alone body image group has the potential to improve body checking cognitions and satisfaction in patients with bulimia nervosa and EDNOS. These findings support the conduct of a randomised controlled trial in order to further develop the evidence base for the effective treatment of eating disorders.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.663522  DOI: Not available
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