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Title: South Asian parents' experiences of adjustment following a diagnosis of learning disability and/or an autism spectrum disorder for their child : a grounded theory approach
Author: Ul-Hassan, A.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2009
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Abstract:
Background: There is a great deal of literature pertaining to White parents’ experiences of having a child with a learning disability. Some of this literature focuses on parents’ experiences of the disclosure of diagnosis of learning disability and/or an autism spectrum disorder, as well as how they come to accept and adjust to a diagnosis. However, very little research has investigated the experiences of South Asian families. Materials and methods: This qualitative study used a grounded theory methodology to explore the experiences of seven South Asian parents in relation to the disclosure of diagnoses as well as issues relating to adjustment post-diagnosis. Semi-structured interviews were used to gather data. Results: The results outline variable experiences in relation to the process of adjustment following a diagnosis. Four core categories were derived from the data to represent stages in a hypothesised model of adjustment. These were: ‘obtaining a diagnosis’; ‘constructing meanings’; ‘finding possibilities for action’; and reconstructing roles and identities’. These core categories were embedded within a number of important contextual influences. Conclusions: The theoretical and clinical implications of the hypothesised model of adjustment are discussed. A methodological critique is provided before outlining reflections on the findings generated.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.663147  DOI: Not available
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