Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.661704
Title: Henry Green : the unstable vision
Author: Scott-Kemball, Simon
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1999
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Abstract:
The first chapter looks at how Green's autobiography tests the concept of a stable self and influences his subsequent representation of character in his novels, where the human subject is increasingly exposed as a construct of words, dissolved in the structures of language and society. In the second chapter I examine the idea of instability as stimulus, looking at how the unstable vision was nurtured during a wartime London under bombardment and blackout, a state of flux which Green would reinterpret as an 'absolute gift'. The third chapter is divided into two parts of which the first half assesses Green's proto-structuralist investigation of the printed word; a progressive questioning of language and textual representation, whereas the second part examines the instability of voice, narration, and authority in Green's fiction. The fourth of my chapters offers a structural analysis of Green's texts, assessing the presence of structural irregularity and temporal friction in the fiction which, I propose, constitutes an unstable aesthetic, in which errors and inconsistencies are regarded as desirable. Finally, chapter five specifically focuses upon Green's novels and theoretical statements from the 1950s, showing how the unstable vision reaches its corollary in his stringently 'non-representational' novels, Nothing and Doting. These novels aspire to a new 'absolute minimum' which, I contend, directly anticipates a new development in fiction, the French nouveau roman. Through this intriguing convergence I hope to suggest how Green's epistemological uncertainties potentially bridge the gap between his modernist heritage and postmodern thought.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.661704  DOI: Not available
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