Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.661649
Title: To farm or not to farm : succession, inheritance and gender
Author: Schwarz, U. A. N.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2002
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Abstract:
Using a whole family approach the theses examines ten families owning medium sized farms in the south east of Scotland. The attitudes to gender are reflected in expectations and job allocations which result in a restrictive environment, making it difficult for daughters or wives to show interest or to be involved in the farm and also for sons to turn away from agriculture. In the same vein, who does what task usually depends on availability, expertise and personal preference and is not gender-neutral. However, the research also revealed, that the presence of stock on the farm makes it more likely for female family members to be involved in farming activities. All agree that ‘equal input’ should be rewarded with an equal share in the farm. However, the parents’ judgement of what is considered ‘equal input’ is influenced by traditional views of gender and the economic realities of farm succession. It is still mainly the eldest able and willing son(s) who takes over and only if there are no boys interested will the girls be given a chance to take on the family farm. (Agriculture remains a physically demanding industry while equal sub-division of the family wealth would frequently result in a non-viable outcome for the farming successor.) Overall, the thesis suggests that gendered expectations have been present throughout the whole process of children growing up and inheriting family farms, but given the right situation, these are not unsurmountable any longer.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.661649  DOI: Not available
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