Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.660406
Title: The relationship between social problem-solving and self-esteem in anorexia nervosa
Author: Paterson, G.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2006
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Abstract:
The current study aimed to investigate social-problem solving and self-esteem in anorexia, using multidimensional measures, with the hypotheses that specific elements of these constructs would be specific to eating pathology and that self-esteem would mediate the relationship between social problem-solving and eating pathology. The study examined multidimensional measures of social problem-solving and self-esteem in 55 female inpatients with a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa and 50 non-clinical matched controls. Participants completed four standardised self-report measures of general symptoms, eating disorders, social problem-solving and self-esteem at one time point only. Results yielded significant differences between groups on all measures. Within groups analysis revealed positive problem orientation, negative problem orientation and avoidance coping and both self-worth and self-competence components of self-esteem, were significantly related to anorexic pathologies involving feelings of concern over eating, weight and shape, but less related to eating restraint. Path analysis indicated that self-esteem mediated the relationship between social problem-solving and eating pathology. The results provide further evidence for the importance of problem orientation and avoidance coping in anorexia and the importance of the worth and competency components of self-esteem. The results also suggested that social problem-solving and self-esteem were significant in development and maintenance of concerns regarding eating weight and shape, but less so to eating restraint. Finally, the results provided support for the mediating role of self-esteem in the relationship between social problem-solving and anorexia; however the issue of causality remains unresolved.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psychol.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.660406  DOI: Not available
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