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Title: The first and second earls of Rutland and their part in the central and local politics of mid-Tudor England
Author: Norris, M. M.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1996
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Abstract:
This thesis investigates the role of Thomas and Henry Manners, first and second earls of Rutland, in the central and local politics of mid-Tudor England. In so doing, five factors are scrutinised throughout: landed property, political and military office-holding, Court politics, religion, and the Manners' network of friends, servants, and relatives. The thesis is divided into seven chapters. Each chapter (except the conclusion) explores how most or all of these factors influenced the political life of the family during a segment of time. Chapter 1 deals with the beginnings of the family until the creation of Thomas Manners, Lord Roos, as earl of Rutland in 1525. The next chapter studies the political life of the new earl until 1536 and particularly emphasises his being drawn into Henry's religious policy. Chapter 3 reveals the effects of his involvement in suppressing the rebels in the Pilgrimage of Grace, his increasing employment in the service of the Crown, and his ability to profit from the Dissolution of the Monasteries until his death in 1543. By this time the family had reached its Tudor economic peak. The themes of continuity and development are explored from the wardship of the next earl until his imprisonment in the Fleet for supporting Northumberland in the Lady Jane Grey crisis. This is followed by a chapter which probes the young earl's ability to come to terms with the Marian regime. Chapter 6 reveals that he experienced even higher favour during Elizabeth's reign, culminating in his office of president of the Council of the North, during which he fell ill and died in 1563. The final chapter places the Manners' achievement in the context of the age.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.660053  DOI: Not available
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