Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.659889
Title: Kiganda and Christian ideas of ekibi in contemporary Baganda society
Author: Nassaka Banja, O.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2004
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Abstract:
This study examines kiganda and Christian ideas of ekibi among the Baganda between 1962 and 2001. The ideas of ekibi (which might approximately to translated as ‘evil’) are discussed and analysed within the socio-political tensions and dynamics of the contemporary evolving Baganda context. Although there are a number of anthropological studies on the Baganda, on their customs and beliefs, there is hardly any study on the kiganda ideas of ekibi. This study therefore seeks to redress this imbalance by discussing and assessing the interaction between kiganda and Christian ideas of ekibi and the extent to which they contribute to the Baganda Christian ideas of ekibi in the Church of Uganda. The research makes use of oral tradition and qualitative fieldwork comprising informal and formal interviews with different age groups made up of both male and female participants. These belong to the enzikiriza ey’obuwangwa (kiganda religion) and to groups within the Church of Uganda such as the Bakulisitaayo (ordinary Christians), the mainstream Balokole (Revivalists), the Bazuukufu (Reawakened) and the Beegayirizi (Intercessors) in both rural and urban areas of the dioceses of Mukono and Namirembe, in the Kampala and Mukono Districts. The study is divided into three main parts. The first part introduces the study and investigates kiganda ideas of ekibi. The pre-colonial ideas of ekibi as derived from oral tradition such as engero (narrative) are examined with the view of exploring the background of the ideas of ekibi among contemporary Baganda society. The ideas of ekibi in the contemporary kiganda worldview are also examined with reference to the kiganda practices and rituals such as the observance of emizizo (taboos), okuloga (sorcery), obusawo (healing) okufa (death) and okwabya olumbe (last funeral rites) within the tensions between the rural-urban dynamics and the forces of change which characterise the Baganda contemporary society. The second part of the study discusses the Christian concepts of ekibi among contemporary Baganda in the Church of Uganda, and the extent to which they impact upon their perceptions, attitudes, practices and ways of life. The ideas of ekibi based on the interpretations of both the Old and New Testaments are also discussed with the view of assessing the extent to which they impact and contribute to the ideas of ekibi among contemporary Baganda in the Church of Uganda. The third part of the study focuses on the interaction and dialogue between kiganda and Christian ideas of ekibi in the Church of Uganda. It assesses the extent to which these ideas integrate and enhance the process of inculturating the ideas of ekibi in the contemporary Baganda context. The research findings indicate clearly that the concept to ekibi remains a vital element of the Baganda’s perception of and aspirations for the wellbeing of the society.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.659889  DOI: Not available
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