Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.659691
Title: Perceptions of pregnancy
Author: Moyes, B. A.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1976
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Abstract:
This thesis describes an intensive, longtitudinal study of a small group of women who were expecting their first babies, in an attempt to describe what it was like for them to be pregnant. The sample were mainly the wives of manual workers who fell outside the managerial ranks (as defined by the Socio-Economic classifications). The work relies upon detailed analysis of three semi-structured tape-recorded interviews per woman, conducted at different periods of their pregnancy. Through giving an overall picture of first pregnancy, I have tried to highlight the variety of reactions to it, and elucidate the range of experiences and definitions that the women had of the situation. The underlying theme of the thesis is the problem of uncertainty, and many of the issues discussed are manifestations of this theme. The first part of the analysis looks at the question of identity. This is closely related to the discussion of body image which follows. The women's perceptions of their identity and body image led many of them to feel embarrassed by certain aspects of their obstetric care. The thesis then considers one of the women's central preoccupations: the management of pain during labour. The second part of the analysis begins by discussing their images of babies, and considers how they coped with their children during their early days as mothers. It goes on to suggest that their reactions to motherhood could be expressed as a continuum based predominantly on their images of themselves and their bodies. In conclusion, the women's perceptions of the meaning of the transition to motherhood are then discussed, and the thesis ends with a summary of some of the implications which the study holds for the maternity services.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.659691  DOI: Not available
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